North West councils license taxis fitted with illegal tyres

Four councils in the North West have been exposed for issuing licenses for taxis fitted with illegal unmarked and unsafe part-worn tyres, raising questions for passenger safety and just how thorough the taxi compliance and licensing procedure is.

John Stone, owner of Stone Tyres, and founder of the Independent Tyre Fitters Alliance, purchased a Skoda Octavia and fitted it with four illegal part-worn tyres and submitted the vehicle to St Helens, Liverpool, Wirral and Sefton council-approved test centres for a taxi compliance test. Each council’s approved test centre passed the vehicle as safe, despite part worn tyres dating from 1999, 2001 and 2003 being fitted on the taxi. To make matters worse, the fourth tyre was an illegal part-worn winter tyre, imported from Germany some 10 years ago. No tyres were marked as ‘Part Worn’, as they should be by law, next to the BS or ECE approval mark.

“This lack of care from our local councils is appalling and raises serious questions over taxi passenger safety in the North West and indeed across the United Kingdom,” says John Stone. “Part-worn tyres are not safe, yet some councils are awarding licenses to vehicles running on illegal and potentially unsafe tyres – it is a disgrace and the licensing of vehicles running illegal part-worn tyres needs to be stopped now.

“Full credit to St Helens council as when I approached them with my findings, they took the issue with great seriousness and decided there and then that this wouldn’t be allowed to happen again. I’m pleased to say that on the back of this campaign St Helens MBC has already agreed to ban the use of part worn tyres on all licensed vehicles. They should be applauded for such a pragmatic and positive response, which ensures the safety of the public.”

The Motor Vehicle Tyres (Safety) Regulations 1994 govern the sale of part-worn tyres, but these are rarely being adhered to, allowing unsafe and illegal tyres to flood the UK’s part worn tyre market, according to the National Tyre Distributors Association (NTDA), which recently reiterated its call for an outright ban on part-worn tyres due to safety concerns.

“As we have advised the DfT on a number of occasions part-worn tyres should not be fitted to vehicles, full stop. John has exposed a serious flaw in taxi licensing testing procedures in not one, but four, areas in the North West and we are extremely concerned that the practice is nationwide. The combined age of those four different makes of tyre was 67 years old, they had illegal repairs, different speed ratings and no part-worn mark, this really is beyond belief! John is to be applauded for the incredible work he has done to expose this shocking situation, but it is appalling that it has taken his personal efforts to uncover such apathy towards passenger safety,” says Stefan Hay, NTDA chief executive. 

“Inspections carried out over several years into the sale of part-worn tyres have shown serious safety breaches, including dangerous and unsafe repairs, exposed cords, bead damage and evidence of runflat damage. We call on these councils to review their procedures without delay.”

John has set up a website and petition to ban part-worn tyres:

www.banpartworntyres.com

NTDA Tyre Industry Conference 2019

This year’s gathering was more than simply commemorating the NTDA’s 90th annual dinner. Autotechnician details the important industry issues raised at the National Tyre Distributors’ Association’s fifth tyre industry conference.

While the International Convention Centre might not have been the most accessible venue for some of its invited guests, the NTDA’s return to Birmingham was important symbolically, because the city not only hosted the association’s very first meeting but also its 2015 re-launch. 

PART WORNS: ‘JE NE REGRETTE RIEN’ 

Its charismatic Chief Executive, Stefan Hay, kick-started proceedings by responding to criticism of its 2017 Manifesto For Change, related to the NTDA’s emphatic stance on the banning of part worn tyres. He remains unrepentant for the stance, addressing the critics who state that NTDA members have a vested interest to sell new tyres. 

“Damn right,” he stated to the audience, “Our members don’t sell part worn tyres… they want to sell more new, safe, legal tyres. I’m making no apology for that!” Citing the lack of enforcement of the current regulations and that last year’s investigation by both TyreSafe and Trading. 

Richard Goddard (pictured) and Peter Carroll highlighted passionately the dangers encountered by recovery operators and tyre technicians, who work at the side of the road.

Standards revealed 99% of the part worn tyre retailers investigated were not complying with the regulations, Mr Hay questioned that if all non-compliant tyres were banned, what would be left? 

After conducting further surveys from its membership, the NTDA has taken its philosophy a step further and launched the campaign, “NTDA Members Don’t Sell Part Worn Tyres”. While supported by 100% of its fellows, the new promotion is aimed ultimately at consumers, to educate them of the risks that part worn tyres present and why knowledgeable tyre distributors will not prejudice their safety, by selling items that are likely to be unsafe. The NTDA has invested in a series of posters, banners and advertisements that are available for its members to order. 

INDUSTRY CHALLENGES 

The focus on part worn tyres was not at the expense of other pressing issues. Continental’s Steve Howatt detailed the challenges of making the tyre industry attractive to new recruits of all ages, training them accordingly and retaining them. He advises garage owners specifically to look into establishing development plans for their employees, not only to help them make fewer errors but to also to make them feel more appreciated, by providing a defined career path. Time and cost-effective methods were detailed, including using social media as an online classroom to foster teamwork. 

The NTDA’s Chief Executive, Stefan Hay, hosted both the conference and the 90th Annual Dinner.

Echoing the comments made by the new NTDA Chairman, Martin O’Brien, about raising awareness of the dangers that roadside tyre operators face under the REACT steering group, Richard Goddard, founding Chairman of the Professional Recovery Operators’ Federation, infused the audience with his passion about the risks that recovery services face on smart motorways especially. During August, September and October 2017, one recovery operator was killed per month, a situation not helped by the authorities not closing the relevant lane and displaying a red cross on the gantry, when an independent recovery operator is working. Frustrated by the lack of official consideration to the safety of his members, Mr Goddard described how establishing an All-Party Parliamentary Group was critical to lobby both the government and Highways England successfully about the safety of roadside technicians. He calls for the right for recovery operators to use red lights, warning of their presence, instead of the amber ones used currently. 

“After all,” he concludes, “The Government must take note of what we endure to keep the roads moving.” The lobbying tactic has worked and an official review is under way. 

After Chris Smith from Michelin Tyre PLC highlighted the impressive forces (of around 10 tonnes), posed by a runaway truck tyre and how TPMS can provide an answer, Ryan Naughton from CAM (Computer Aided Marketing) detailed how computer software continues to transform the tyre trade. From capturing data and using it to benefit both your customers’ safety and your business, to mobile solutions for direct data access and stock management in the workshop, there was plenty to fire the imagination for garages seeking to evolve their businesses. This was especially relevant, because Quentin Le Hetet from GiPA UK focussed on tech-savvy ‘Millennials’ and how they will be not only your customers but also your staff in the near future, if not already. As usual with his presentations, the charismatic Frenchman proved that a stat-fest does not mean a snooze-fest. In 2013, for example 10% of Millennials bought car parts online, in 2018, it more than doubled to 21%. Combined with their prolific smartphones use, willingness to research, a reliance on positive reviews and high expectations of immediate responses, the aftermarket was urged to focus on the effectiveness and user friendliness of their online outlets. 

The worrying issue of being guilty until proven innocent was considered by Craig Allen of ABAX, who informed delegates that the HMRC is being more proactive in chasing Benefit In Kind tax for employees using work vans for personal use. The use of telematics, therefore, is a key way that you can log journeys and ensure that any investigation, which can stretch back six years of trading, does not cripple your business both in terms of time taken and any back-taxes due, which can be up to £34,000 per vehicle. 

Martin O’Brien, the NTDA’s new National Chairman, described the work that the NTDA has done not only with its ‘NTDA Members Don’t Sell Part Worn Tyres’ campaign but also with lobbying the DfT about banning tyres aged 10 years and over for buses and HGVs and also passenger cars. The results of the consultation are being analysed by the DfT at the time of writing.

The final afternoon session started with a green theme, with Simon Hudson from Astutus Research detailing the very positive work that has been going on in the EU (and the UK) that has seen average used tyre recycling rates increase from around 60% to over 90% in 18 years. The importance of standards (the theme of this magazine, incidentally) were also emphasised by Richard Armstrong of Philips/Lumileds, who moved away from tyres, to emphasise the issues associated with counterfeit products in the aftermarket. We shall expand on this issue in a future issue. Dave Walker of Remit Training rounded-off the industry topics, with a call to support the Specialist Tyre Operative Apprenticeship Scheme, which has been the result of 15 months of hard work. “Use it, or lose it,” was his message to the tyre industry. 

Despite the many serious industry topics raised, Reverend Richard Coles’ sprinkling of celebrity stardust provided immensely humorous, yet down-to-earth tales of his rise from being a ‘gay runaway’ from Northampton, partnering with Jimmy Somerville in The Smoke to establish The Communards, through to finding religion and being the only applicant to tick the box marked ‘have you ever used recreational drugs?’ on his Ordination Application form. It was a fitting end to round-off a very thought-provoking conference, proving not only the NTDA’s awareness of the challenges facing the industry but also the willingness to tackle them head-on. 

 

NTDA Tyre Industry Conference: Part worn tyres and technician safety are key themes

This year’s gathering was more than simply commemorating the NTDA’s 90th Annual Dinner, says Rob Marshall, who details the important industry issues raised at the National Tyre Distributors’ Association’s fifth Tyre Industry Conference.

While the International Convention Centre might not have been the most accessible venue for some of its invited guests, the NTDA’s return to Birmingham was important symbolically, because the city not only hosted the association’s very first meeting but also its 2015 re-launch.

Part Worns: Je ne regrette rien

Its charismatic Chief Executive, Stefan Hay, kick-started proceedings by responding to criticism of its 2017 Manifesto For Change, related to the NTDA’s emphatic stance on the banning of part worn tyres. He remains unrepentant for the stance, addressing the critics who state that NTDA members have a vested interest to sell new tyres.

“Damn right,” he stated to the audience, “Our members don’t sell part worn tyres… they want to sell more new, safe, legal tyres. I’m making no apology for that!”

Citing the lack of enforcement of the current regulations and that last year’s investigation by both TyreSafe and Trading Standards revealed 99% of the part worn tyre retailers investigated were not complying with the regulations, Mr Hay questioned that if all non-compliant tyres were banned, what would be left?

After conducting further surveys from its membership, the NTDA has taken its philosophy a step further and launched the campaign, “NTDA Members Don’t Sell Part Worn Tyres”. While supported by 100% of its fellows, the new promotion is aimed ultimately at consumers, to educate them of the risks that part worn tyres present and why knowledgeable tyre distributors will not prejudice their safety, by selling covers that are likely to be unsafe. The NTDA has invested in a series of posters, banners and advertisements that are available for its members to order.

 

Industry challenges

The focus on part worn tyres was not at the expense of other pressing issues. Continental’s Steve Howatt detailed the challenges of making the tyre industry attractive to new recruits of all ages, training them accordingly and retaining them. He advises garage owners specifically to look into establishing development plans for their employees, not only to help them make fewer errors but to also to make them feel more appreciated, by providing a defined career path. Time and cost-effective methods were detailed, including using social media as an online classroom to foster teamwork.

Echoing the comments made by the new NTDA Chairman, Martin O’Brien, about raising awareness of the dangers that roadside tyre operators face under the REACT steering group, Richard Goddard, founding Chairman of the Professional Recovery Operators’ Federation, infused the audience with his passion about the risks that recovery services face on smart motorways especially. During August, September and October 2017, one recovery operator was killed per month, a situation not helped by the authorities not closing the relevant lane and displaying a red cross on the gantry, when an independent recovery operator is working. Frustrated by the lack of official consideration to the safety of his members, Mr Goddard described how establishing an All-Party Parliamentary Group was critical to lobby both the government and Highways England successfully about the safety of roadside technicians. He calls for the right for recovery operators to use red lights, warning of their presence, instead of the amber ones used currently.

“After all,” he concludes, “The Government must take note of what we endure to keep the roads moving.” The lobbying tactic has worked and an official review is under way.

After Chris Smith from Michelin Tyre PLC highlighted the impressive forces (of around 10 tonnes), posed by a runaway truck tyre and how TPMS can provide an answer, Ryan Naughton from CAM (Computer Aided Marketing) detailed how computer software continues to transform the tyre trade. From capturing data and using it to benefit both your customers’ safety and your business, to mobile solutions for direct data access and stock management in the workshop, there was plenty to fire the imagination for garages seeking to evolve their businesses. This was especially relevant, because Quentin Le Hetet from GiPA UK focussed on tech-savvy ‘Millennials’ and how they will be not only your customers but also your staff in the near future, if not already. As usual with his presentations, the charismatic Frenchman proved that a stat-fest does not mean a snooze-fest. In 2013, for example 10% of Millennials bought car parts online, in 2018, it more than doubled to 21%. Combined with their prolific smartphones use, willingness to research, a reliance on positive reviews and high expectations of immediate responses, the aftermarket was urged to focus on the effectiveness and user friendliness of their online outlets.

The worrying issue of being guilty until proven innocent was considered by Craig Allen of ABAX Ltd, who informed delegates that the HMRC is being more proactive in chasing Benefit In Kind tax for employees using work vans for personal use. The use of telematics, therefore, is a key way that you can log journeys and ensure that any investigation, which can stretch back six years of trading, does not cripple your business both in terms of time taken and any back-taxes due, which can be up to £34,000 per vehicle.

The final afternoon session started with a green theme, with Simon Hudson from Astutus Research detailing the very positive work that has been going on in the EU (and the UK) that has seen average used tyre recycling rates increase from around 60% to over 90% in 18 years. The importance of standards (the theme of our next magazine, incidentally) were also emphasised by Richard Armstrong of Philips/Lumileds, who moved away from tyres, to emphasise the issues associated with counterfeit products in the aftermarket. We shall expand on this issue in a future issue. Dave Walker of Remit Training rounded-off the industry topics, with a call to support the Specialist Tyre Operative Apprenticeship Scheme, which has been the result of 15 months of hard work. “Use it, or lose it” was his message to the tyre industry.

Despite the many serious industry topics raised, Reverend Richard Coles’ sprinkling of celebrity stardust provided immensely humorous, yet down-to-earth tales of his rise from being a ‘gay runaway’ from Northampton, partnering with Jimmy Somerville in The Smoke to establish The Communards, through to finding religion and being the only applicant to tick the box marked ‘have you ever used recreational drugs?’ on his Ordination Application form. It was a fitting end to round-off a very thought-provoking conference, proving not only the NTDA’s awareness of the challenges facing the industry but also the willingness to tackle them head-on.

Tyre Association tackles false membership claims

The National Tyre Distributors Association, NTDA, is taking action against UK tyre retailers who are falsely claiming to be members of the Association, are displaying the NTDA logo on their recovery vehicles, websites and marketing material, or who are advertising that repair work carried out at their tyre depots is carried out to ‘the NTDA standard’.

Logos denoting membership of, or approval by, an organisation such as a trade association, may be legitimately used by businesses. However, their misuse, deliberate or otherwise, can result in a commercial advantage, enabling work to be acquired unfairly, and constitutes a breach of UK law.

The Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008, CPRs, specifically ban businesses from displaying any form of trust mark, quality mark or equivalent collective mark without authorisation. They also ban any form of claim that a business, or their service, has been approved, authorised or endorsed by a public or private body when it hasn’t. It is also a breach of the CPRs to provide false or deceptive information.

Commenting on the situation, NTDA Chief Executive Stefan Hay said: “The NTDA membership logo is a Patent Office/Intellectual Property Office registered collective trade mark across a number of classifications. We have been staggered by the blatant abuse of the logo and the associated claims being made by unscrupulous tyre retailers. Incidents range from companies using the logo on their vans and websites, (including use of the NTDA Tyre Industry Awards logo inferring companies have achieved a level of excellence), to eBay traders claiming that their part worn tyres are repaired to the NTDA standard, a standard, which of course does not exist. We only know about some of these companies because consumers have complained about their poor service and shoddy workmanship!”

Stefan continued: “We have commenced action against a number of retailers. In the first instance we have sent a ‘cease and desist’ letter to all of the companies that have breached the CPRs giving them 7 working days to confirm, in writing, that they have removed the NTDA and associated logos and all other reference to the NTDA from their premises, vehicles, marketing collateral, advertising and online trading portals. We hope that we will not have to further escalate matters, but will not hesitate to report these companies to Trading Standards with a view to pursuing full prosecution. We will not tolerate such companies bringing the NTDA and its legitimate members in to disrepute.”

Failure to comply with the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008 is a criminal offence. The maximum penalty is a fine and two years’ imprisonment.

www.ntda.co.uk

Tyre experts look at the bigger picture

Hiring cars via apps, workshop referrals from China’s answer to Amazon and how to run a successful workshop – just a few items on the agenda at this month’s NTDA conference Tyre industry professionals and the aftermarket at large, gather each year to discuss current trends in technology and other influences shaping automotive repair businesses at the National Tyre Distributors Association conference.

Preparing for the future was a major theme at the event and Quentin le Hetet of GiPA UK, an aftermarket research agency who monitor industry and motorist developments, set the scene with an overview of some automotive megatrends and how these will directly affect workshops.

Quentin began by looking at the growth of the car parc globally, highlighting
the 3.7% rise seen in Europe between 2011 and 2017, compared to the 137% increase in China over the same period. China is set to surpass the US market as the largest aftermarket player in the world, and we can expect them to be
a major player in alternative vehicle technology. This explosion in China’s aftermarket has driven e-commerce, with China’s answer to Amazon, Alibaba (the largest online retailer in the world), edging its way into parts supply. They have invested in Jingu, who link drivers to workshops to fit the part purchased.

Quentin suggests this will become more commonplace in the UK, completely reshaping how drivers end up in a workshop.

The ‘car as a service’ rather than a commodity, was the next megatrend discussed, leading to less cars on the road but increased usage, therefore no shortage of maintenance or repairs. GiPA stated how cities will be early adopters in this area, leading the change to consumers using apps to rent from a fleet of cars for an amount of time rather than owning vehicles.

THE SUCCESSFUL WORKSHOP

Andy Savva, or ‘The Garage Inspector,’ made a huge success of his repair workshop in London due to his enviable mix of technical aptitude and business acumen – and now dedicates his time to sharing the latter with independent workshops through consultancy. Andy delivered some words of wisdom at the event and started with the basics – to be a success, you must have a vision. Before he opened the doors of Brunswick Garage to the public, he held focus evenings to understand what motorists didn’t like about the service received from existing independents and dealers. The results fed into the values that underpinned Brunswick and this vision was included in staff handbooks, displayed in reception and used in customer marketing – he basically set out to do the opposite of what the others were doing!

“Training should be a habit, no-one can be fully skilled.”

DEMONSTRATING COMPETENCY

The NTDA introduced three licences last year – Licensed Retail Tyre Technician, Licensed Vehicle Service Technician and Licensed Commercial Tyre Technician in a bid to improve the safety and standard of work of tyre technicians. Chairman, Prashant Chopra, told delegates that more than 250 licences had been issued under the new Tyre Technician Professional Development Scheme, with over 5,000 issued for the commercial benchmark. Chopra explained:

“A number of tyre distributors, manufacturers, aftermarket suppliers and training providers have adopted
the scheme both to deliver the required training and assessment, but also to deliver refresher and CPD training. The NTDA believes, as do many other professional bodies in the sector, that training, competency assessment and licensing are the way forward in ensuring we have a professional, safe and fit for purpose workforce in the future.”

Time to ban part-worn tyres

The National Tyre Distributors Association delivers shocking results of motorist survey at industry conference.

With my tyre pressure and tread dutifully checked, we headed off to the National Tyre Distributors Association’s (NTDA) industry conference in Milton Keynes to learn of the challenges facing the tyre industry. NTDA Chief Executive Stefan Hay delivered his vision of seeing a ban of part worn tyres at last year’s event but this has not been realised. 90% of NTDA members support the ban but cannot see how it can be achieved, so plans in its Manifesto For Change seek to address this and other member concerns; including working to promote and increase tyre technician skills and making the industry more attractive to new talent.

Throughout 2018, the body will encourage the take up of an accreditation scheme for part worn tyre dealers, to establish a ‘quality mark’ highlighting to motorists the risks associated without the mark and the possibility of raising tread depths in an industry-accredited part worn market, with new quality marks applied to tyres over, for instance, 3mm.

NTDA WARNS MOTORISTS NOT TO RISK LIFE FOR ‘CHEAPEST OPTION’

The NTDA conducted research among 1,000 motorists, which found 65% admitting to buying part worn tyres because they are the cheapest option – although as many as 97% of all part worn tyres are being sold illegally.

While the Motor Vehicle Tyres (Safety) Regulations 1994 govern the sale of part worn tyres, the NTDA say these are rarely being adhered to, allowing unsafe and illegal tyres to flood the UK’s part worn tyre market. Inspections carried out over several years into the sale of part worn tyres show serious safety breaches, including dangerous and unsafe repairs, exposed cords, bead damage and evidence of runflat damage.

“More than 40% of vehicle defect-related deaths in the UK are caused by illegal, defective or under-inflated tyres.”

The NTDA has been instrumental in helping Trading Standards prosecute traders who illegally sold defective part worn tyres, but the Association’s latest research shows economic factors are pulling some motorists towards what they think will be a bargain.

Defective tyres are a major safety risk; in 2015, illegal, defective or under- inflated tyres were responsible for more than 40% of all vehicle defect- related deaths in the UK. Additionally, having illegal, defective or under- inflated tyres was also responsible for 35% of all casualties on the roads caused by vehicle defects.

The NTDA’s latest motorists’ survey showed an alarming lack of concern for tyre safety. Almost 60% of those surveyed were not aware that the minimum legal tread depth for a tyre in the UK is 1.6mm and 85% didn’t know the minimum tread depth for part worn tyres is 2mm. 40% of drivers also divulged they only check their tyres’ tread when they see worn patches or when an MOT is due. Worryingly, 38% say they begrudge buying new tyres, will put it off and try and get as much wear out of them as possible before getting them replaced. When they do purchase a replacement tyre, more than half admit cost is the prevailing consideration.

Stefan Hay, Chief Executive at the NTDA comments: “The current regulations are not working and we are seeing more and more illegal tyres being fitted to cars as drivers are swayed by cost alone. That is why we are calling, in the absence of greater enforcement of the regulations or an effective form of industry self- regulation, for a complete ban on part-worn tyres. Unless drastic action is taken now we are going to see the casualty and death toll rise as a result of illegal and defective tyres.”

 

Industry bodies come together

Automotive Aftermarket liaison group joins forces as independent aftermarket faces threat of losing diagnostic connectivity via the OBD port – by Nicola St Clair.

For those of you who don’t have any dealings with trade associations, you may wonder what benefit they are to workshops and the industry in general. Having worked in the aftermarket for 15 years, I have seen first-hand the practical experience each brings to the table and the hard work that goes on behind the scenes to promote a level-playing field, best practice and to represent the interests and issues of workshops and suppliers with the vehicle manufacturers and those involved in creating legislation here in the UK and in Brussels.
THE ASSOCIATIONS THAT FORM THE AALG ARE:
  • Garage Equipment Association (GEA) – Dave Garratt, CEO
  • Scottish Motor Trade Association (SMTA) – Sandy Burgess, CEO
  • Independent Automotive Aftermarket Federation (IAAF) – Wendy Williamson, CEO
  • Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI) – Steve Nash, CEO
  • Independent Garage Association (IGA) – Stuart James, CEO
  • British Battery Industry Federation (BBIF)
  • National Tyre Distributors Association (NTDA) – Stefan Hay, CEO
  • Federation of Engine Re-manufacturers (FER)
On a daily basis, each association is delving into its membership’s own areas of concern but they regularly join forces when the going gets tough, in the form of the Automotive Aftermarket Liaison Group (AALG), see side panel to meet the team. They strengthen the lobbying power of the UK aftermarket by discussing matters of common interest between its members and share resources to address issues. The AALG has successfully lobbied against several government proposals that would have negatively impacted the retail automotive industry, and are now raising awareness of several new consultations.
They recently met at Silverstone to discuss its new lobbying position on European issues that affect the aftermarket in a post-Brexit Britain. Here are the concerns raised by each member of the panel.
Dave Garratt, GEA CEO:
“The aftermarket is often overlooked, but it plays a significant role in the UK’s economy. The AALG’s job is to bring our industries associations, societies and institutes together to work for the
interests of all businesses associated with the aftermarket. Furthermore, in the event of Brexit, the development of the connected car and the trend towards electric and eventually autonomous vehicles, we believe there has never been a more important time to work together.
“Garage equipment manufacturers need to provide the aftermarket with the tools required to service, inspect and diagnose tomorrow’s vehicles. The introduction of the connected car brings forward a real threat of losing diagnostic connectivity for the independent sector. As I said earlier, there has never been a more important time for our organisations to work together to protect consumer choice”.
Screen Shot 2017-07-16 at 13.37.17
Stuart James, IGA CEO:
“One of the biggest issues affecting the independent sector is the ability to access vehicle manufacturers technical information, standing united with other aftermarket associations to lobby in the UK and on a European front will heighten the chances of a robust and time efficient solution”.
Screen Shot 2017-07-16 at 13.37.33
Wendy Williamson, IAAF CEO:
“We are currently striving towards overcoming a number of potential industry threats and have begun to promote the Your Car – Your Choice campaign to a wider audience. Protecting the aftermarket’s rights during the development of the connected car and Type Approval legislation is of paramount importance to the Federation, with the aim of ensuring the independent aftermarket
has a level playing field when it comes to access to technical, parts, repair and maintenance information. The IAAF strongly opposes extending the first MOT test from three years to four for
new vehicles and we are playing an active role in AALG to combat this.”
Sandy Burgess, SMTA CEO:
“As we progress towards the Brexit date, the landscape for our industry will change, no doubt creating any number of situations which will generate the need for significant, and potentially
costly, change. Acting as a strong united body, the AALG will be able to use the pooled resource of the members to ensure a clear interpretation of the impacts of these changes and provide clarity of understanding to assist those within the industry to take sensible action to mitigate these impacts”.
Screen Shot 2017-07-16 at 13.37.02
Steve Nash, IMI CEO:
“The AALG is a great example of the industry working together for the common good. With such a sophisticated and multi-faceted business as automotive is, it is not surprising that we have a large, diverse mix of representative bodies, all of which have important roles to play in looking after the interests of their respective members.
“But when there are important issues of mutual interest, such as the proposed changes to the first MOT test, it makes absolute sense to work together to form a larger and more powerful lobbying group with a common goal and a single voice. The Automotive Aftermarket Lobbying Group (AALG) was formed to do exactly that.”
Stefan Hay, NTDA CEO:
“Tyres are a crucial safety component and a major contributor to MOT failure. As a result, vast technological advances have been made to improve their performance in recent times, yet many
motorists still have a very laissez-faire attitude to basic tyre checks, with some still choosing to buy dangerous part- worn tyres. We welcome the support of our fellow AALG members in raising
consumer awareness of the importance of regular tyre maintenance”.
www.AALG.org.uk
An extended article is available on www.autotechnician.co.ukthis includes the panel’s views
on technician licensing, the small number of independent workshops taking up hybrid training & more. We will be discussing major concerns with each association as they continue to develop across the next few issues. If you would like to address your industry concerns with a trade body or come along with Autotechnician to meet them in person to find out how their work affects yours, email Editor Nicola@Autotechnician.co.uk

Autogem MD becomes chair of tyre trade body

Autogem Invicta’s Managing Director Prashant Chopra has been appointed as the National Chairman of the National Tyre Distributors Association, (NTDA), taking over from Roger Griggs, Communications Director of European Tyre Enterprises.

Commenting on the handover, the association’s Chief Executive Stefan Hay, says that Prashant, “adds a whole new dimension, as his company is an aftermarket supplier member of the Association, which in itself is an indication of how the NTDA is rapidly becoming an association for both tyre professionals and the associated autocrat aftermarket, where, over the past three years, we have experienced incredible membership growth.”

Founded in 1930, the NTDA is a strongly proactive trade association representing the interests of the tyre wholesale, distribution and retail sectors of the automotive aftermarket industry.

 

NTDA National Chairman Prashant Chopra, with South & Central South Chairman Gavin White.